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Sunday, May 13, 2018

When reaching the peak, don't weep.

I've said it many times, my mom didn't cook much. That doesn't mean that she wasn't a good cook. One of her greatest cooking talents was making meringue. She always achieved that perfect peak. But, I only remember her making meringue for one thing... her Fluffy White Frosting out of her Better Homes and Gardens cookbook. Her go-to for dessert was a yellow cake with fluffy white frosting.

We had Mick's family down for Mother's Day today, so I thought I would make something using meringue. Mick's mom likes coconut and I was still working on perfecting a new coconut pie I have been working on, so I thought why not. I hadn't made anything with meringue in a very long time. I was a little nervous. I made a chocolate pie too, which I also wanted to top.


I was pretty happy with it. After I finished setting the pies, I couldn't help eating some of the leftover meringue. I did the same with both pie fillings. I know you aren't supposed to eat raw batters and such, but I do anyway. One day it will probably get me.

I got the pies in the oven to brown the meringue and the coconut browned pretty well, but the chocolate was only browned on one side, so I left it in for a couple of minutes longer. That turned out to be a mistake. I opened the oven and it was dripping, so I quickly removed it and set it on the counter. I went back to it a minute later. There was a pool all around the pie. Apparently, if you overbake meringue, it will weep! I ended up putting paper towels under it and it kept weeping. I read that baking it too long will begin to make it shrink, squeezing the sugar and moisture out. I will have to keep a close eye on one the next time.

Before I baked them to set the meringue.

We had a great day. Mick's parents got here about 11am and stayed until 3pm. I think that's a record. His mom always worries about her cats being in the house alone, so she usually wants to get back home quickly. It was really nice outside, but a little warm. Still, we didn't want to be inside. We set up the BBQ chicken, baked beans, potatoes and cole slaw on the porch. I also made deviled eggs. It might be the Southerner in me, but there always has to be a plate of deviled eggs at every gathering. I also wanted to include my grandmaw Edge in the day, so I used a serving bowl of hers. I think it was on every table we ate at when we visited them growing up. I think one time when dad went to visit them, they sent some food back in the bowl and we just never gave it back. It was one of the things I wanted when we cleaned out dad's house.

It's part of a whole set of dishes grandmaw and granddaddy had. I think its called Alpine Swiss or something like that. I looked them up once and they came from gas stations. You could get different pieces with a full tank of gas. 

In between dinner and dessert, Mick's mom asked for some gloves and pruning shears. She insisted on weeding the flower beds. I helped what I could, but she started to point out where the poison ivy was and I stayed clear. I have always been very allergic to any poison. She usually wants to get into the flower beds when they come over. A few minutes later and she had most of the backyard cleared. 

The promise of pie got her to come in and clean up. For a tiny woman, she can eat quite a few desserts. Mick made his banana pudding, his sister brought a strawberry pie and a friend brought some muffins filled with peach and cherry. Well, the chocolate pie tasted good, but the hit was the coconut. Mick's mom really liked it, so I gave her the rest to take home. We usually give them and his sister some food to take home. We always make way more than we can eat and we don't want that many leftovers. I rarely give up any deviled eggs though.


I think his mom had a great Mother's Day. We also put together a card with some pictures of all the family and the animals. She kept looking it over and over. She really liked it. When everyone left, we did what we always do. We took a nap! After all that food, sleeping it off was the best remedy for full bellies.

It was nice to include my mom and grandmaw a little in the day. Happy Mother's Day.






Friday, May 4, 2018

Grandmaw's handwritten recipes

I told you a couple of weeks ago on social media that I had an announcement to make and if you hadn't already guessed what it was, its that I am writing a cookbook to go along with this blog! I know I told several of you and I've made small mentions of it, but it is officially in the works. From the beginning, I knew I wanted to turn this blog into a book someday. I just didn't know what kind of book. Just like this blog came out of some of you telling me that I should write, the book idea turned into a cookbook because so many friends and family have told me that I should write a cookbook. It may just turn out to be something that I self-publish and give to family and friends, but it would be great if it turned out to be something more. I plan on it being more and I am moving in that direction. I will need your help though. I need your support by spreading the word of this blog and my social media pages. It would greatly help me find a publisher if I have a strong following to show them. The growth of this project has been slow, but purposely so. I want it to be something that people want to read and that it grows organically. I could purchase apps or use services that go out and find me followers. That would certainly make my social media presence grow, but will they know who The Appalachian Tale is? Personally, I follow what I see pages or people that I like. I figure if they like something, I will too. Or, I will search for topics that interest me. One of my favorite topics is Appalachia! I search out and follow pages, blogs, podcasts, etc. that feature or focus on Appalachian living. These are kindred spirits that have ended up following me too. Its helped me build a little community for myself of like-minded people like The Blind Pig & the Acorn and Appalachian Mountain Roots. If you like me, you will love them! I learn so much from them and look forward to their posts. So, please share my posts and pages with people you think will like it, and then ask them to share it too. Again, I want this to be for people who are interested and engaged. I know I have been distracted and have not written as much, but I am getting back to it and you will see much more. I want to share this journey with you, especially if I am asking you to help me. I need to come up with some type of reward for helping me! I will certainly give mention to several people in the cookbook. Just your engagement so far has helped me. So, from here on out, some of my posts will be about the cookbook, more recipe testing and I also want your feedback. Let me know what you think about a recipe, tell me if you've tried it and how it turned out. Ask me questions and ask them about anything. I am pretty much an open book myself! So with all that in mind, here is a post about the cookbook.

Last week I got to spend some time with Aunt Alice and Uncle Andy. Alice is dad's sister and they live just outside Atlanta, GA. I asked her ahead of coming if she had any of grandmaw's recipes or cookbooks, that I am working on writing a cookbook. She immediately responded that one of my grandmaw's recipes was on the front of the fridge. As soon as I got there, I took a pic of it. I just couldn't wait to see it. I hadn't seen her handwriting in a long time. It was as familiar to me as she was. When I saw it, I could see her face and hear her voice. She always called me Jim, whereas my family always called me Jimmy. Only she and a couple of other very close people call me Jim and I like it that way. So when I saw it, I could literally hear her say "Jim, here's a recipe for your cookbook." Aunt Alice calls me Jim too.

Grandmaw Edge had the best smile and laugh, and she did both all the time. By the way, I have the bowl just to the left, between the mug and the salt shaker. It matches the pattern on the mug!


I loved being around grandmaw. She had a great sense of humor and the best laugh. I remember one time that we got her to laugh just by laughing ourselves, over nothing. We all ended up in tears and couldn't breathe because we were laughing so hard over nothing at all. I think a good laugh is like a good cry. You feel so good afterward and recharged. She was genuinely interested in you and you could have the best conversations with her. One time while visiting them, I got myself in trouble for something. As punishment, I had to stay at the house with grandmaw while everyone else got to go somewhere. I don't remember what it was that I did, but I remember that afternoon with her, and it was great! She made us lunch and we sat on the screen porch and talked. It was probably the first time that I got some alone time with her, which is rare in a big family. I don't know why she was being punished and had to stay with me, but I think she enjoyed it as much as I did. I couldn't for the life of me tell you what I missed out on. I hope everybody had a good time doing whatever it was they did, but I doubt they enjoyed being gone as much as I enjoyed them being gone. I was probably 5 or 6 when that happened and I didn't get some alone time with her again until I stayed with them for a few weeks the summer I turned 12.

After Alice showed me the recipe on the fridge, she pulled out her recipe box. I went through the whole thing and ended up taking pictures of nearly 70 recipes. I only remember her making us a couple of the things I found, so I have more recipes to find. I am hoping someone in the family has more. Some of the meals I remember the most included pot roast and gravy and mashed potatoes. She always fixed us a big breakfast, so the smell of bacon always makes me think of being there too. She probably just knew how to make those things, so I will never find her recipe for those.

The first recipe I've made so far is her Three Way Shortbread. I am not sure why it's called Three Way though. The recipe only has two ways on it. So, I figure that I am destined to come up with the third way, which I think will help me feel more connected to the whole project. It's like decades ago she left so one of us could finish it. So far I've only made the first method, which is basic shortbread. It was so good too. Some things don't need to be complicated with layers and layers of flavors.

Here is her basic recipe:

Shortbread

Ingredients:
1 1/4 cup plain flour
3 tablespoons sugar
4 tablespoons butter

Directions:
For shortbread wedged, mix flour and sugar, add butter and mix until crumbly. Form into a ball and knead until smooth. Roll dough into an 8 inch circle. Cut dough into 12 or 16 wedges. Do not separate. Bake at 325 degrees for 25 - 30 minutes. While warm, recut wedges. Remove from pan.

I cut it into 16 wedges, which made them the perfect size.

Tender and sweet


So I did as instructed. After cutting them the second time, I did let them cool on the pan until they firmed up. I probably should have left them in a minute or two longer to crisp up a little more. They were done all the way through, but I like them a little crisp.

For the second method, she made Thumbprint cookies. What do you think I should add for the third way?

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Who got the White Chocolate Bunny?

Happy Easter, everyone! I hope it's been a great day for you, filled with family and fun. We had Mick's family over, as we do most holidays. We fixed a ham, mashed potatoes & gravy, Mick's now famous baked beans, green beans, my potato salad and deviled eggs. It would not be a holiday meal without deviled eggs and mine are the best! Well, at least I think so.

Mary taught me how to make the potato salad and it's one of those things I make that I don't have a recipe for. I just know when it's right. I put some of my bread and butter pickles in it, along with some pickle juice. It helps that balance of sweet and tangy. I gave half of it to Mick's mom to take home because Mick won't eat it and I would eat it all if given half a chance. I always make myself a few extra deviled eggs and tuck them away in the fridge, kinda like it's my own Easter egg hunt! The dozen that went on the table were all gone, so I am glad I did.

My earliest memories of Easter are dying eggs. Mom had a set of plastic coffee cups that we dipped the eggs in. She would put on a pot of eggs, the kettle, and got out the vinegar and food coloring. She also covered the kitchen table in paper or a plastic tablecloth 'cause the color was going to go everywhere. I always loved the smell of the vinegar and the hot water in the cups. When we were done, our fingers looked like tie-dye shirts. When she got tired of using the food coloring, she got us the egg dying kits that came with little coloring pills, a wire dipper and the box turned into an egg display. I think we only colored a dozen eggs, but it seemed to last for hours. We really did have a good time with it. We almost always did it the night before Easter.

On Easter morning, we would get up and run to the kitchen to see what the Easter Bunny had left us. Our baskets were lined up on the big chest freezer we had. Mine was to the far left, and mine and Bobby's baskets were the same size. They had a wooden bottom, wooden handle and a plastic-like ribbon woven around the sides. Pat's was a little bigger, but Ricky's was the biggest. All our baskets were stored inside his. There were a couple of the eggs we colored the night before in each, jelly beans scattered around and we each got a chocolate bunny. One of us though got the white chocolate bunny. Each year it would be someone different so I couldn't wait to see if it was me! We also got little chocolate eggs wrapped in colored foil. We couldn't eat our chocolate bunny right away, but we could sneak a chocolate egg or two before we had to get dressed to go to Sunrise Service.

After returning from church, we went to Grandmaw Barton's. The whole family would be there over the course of a couple of hours. All the kids would end up outside to play, but we had to be careful to stay out of the flowerbeds, which was almost impossible. She had flowerbeds everywhere. She also had concrete statues of animals in lots of the beds. My favorite was the donkey. I always wanted to ride him like a pony. I am sure we did, but Grandmaw would yell at us that we were gonna break his neck. A couple of years we had an Easter Egg hunt out in the front yard too. Try keeping a couple dozen kids out of the flowerbeds when they held the promise of a dirty hard boiled egg! Before it was all over, we would gather for a family picture in front of the house. There are so many pics like that. It's hard to tell sometimes which holiday was which from our pictures.

This is the next generation. I don't even know how many great-grandchildren or even great-great-grandchildren there were.

We also had an egg hunt before Easter on the playground of the elementary school we went to. Mom would take us and we would walk to the school with our neighbor. The playground was huge, so the hiding possibilities were endless. One year I got a nosebleed and had to stop hunting, pinch my nose and hold my head back. On the walk home, we stopped at a gas station across from Tom's Brook Elementary and got a Pepsi. Just one though, that we all shared. We would take a sip and pass it around. The school was only a mile from home, but we didn't have sidewalks past the couple of houses next to the school so we had to walk in the grass and up in neighbor's yards to stay out of traffic. When we returned to school from Spring break, we would look to see if we could still find and egg or two.

When I started to work, I had to work on Easter. My brothers were going to car races and I think dad had to work too. I worked at The Virginian Truck Stop bussing tables. They had a special that day of stuffed pork chops, so I invited mom to have lunch with me. I think that was the first time I got to take her out to eat. She dressed up and had on a red polka-dotted blouse. I hated the idea of her being alone that day, so I was glad we could enjoy it. The Easter dinners at Grandmaw Barton's just kind of ended or we just didn't go.

We also stopped having Easter baskets. They were stored in the attic, with the grass still in them. When we pulled them out, I think for my niece, the grass was all stuck together and there were a couple of dried up jelly beans in them. I don't know that I've eaten a jelly bean since. We would always get a couple of chocolate bunnies though. 

Happy Easter!

Sunday, February 4, 2018

Waste Not, Want Bread

One of the things that you learn growing up poor, is to not waste anything if you can help it. And, it seems that whatever you turn something into, comes out even better. We used to get bananas all the time growing up, being about the cheapest fruit you can buy. Most of them were gone before they would go bad, but every now and then they would start to spot up and get too soft to eat. To me, that's when they're just about right! Right for bread that is.

At one time I was making banana bread so often that I knew how to do it without even looking at the recipe. I used the one in mom's Better Homes & Gardens New Cook Book, but when I moved out on my own I had to find a new recipe because I didn't write it down. I found lots of recipes for adding just about anything to it. I think my favorite was to add chocolate chips. I even tried one recipe that included a spoon of peanut butter in the middle with chocolate chips on top. It was not one that I repeated. I also found out that when I didn't have 3 brothers to help eat up the bananas, they were ripening before I could even use them for bread. I figured out though that I could just throw them into the freeze, in their peel, and bring them out when I wanted to make banana bread. I just let them thaw in the sink and when it came time to peel them, I could just pinch off the stem end and the banana would come squirting out. They come out self-mashed almost! It's kinda gross to see, but they work just as well. If they get bitter, add a little extra sugar to your mix.

When mom passed, dad gave me her cookbook. It was one of the only things I really wanted. I use it more than most of my other cookbooks, but I still play with the recipes and make something of my own. Mick's mom always puts pineapple in her banana bread, so I played with the recipe to add some in. It's my new favorite, especially since I could combine both of their recipes.

We had a couple of bananas that Mick was about to throw out. He eats them all week, but I don't like to eat bananas anymore. I guess your taste buds do change over time and I just don't care for them. Usually, he just tosses them when they begin to get the least bit soft, but he asked me if I wanted to make bread. I think that was his way of hinting that he wanted some, so I made it for breakfast this morning.

Pineapple Banana Bread with Pineapple Glaze

Pineapple Banana Bread with Pineapple Glaze

Needed for the bread:
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon mayonnaise
2 ripe bananas
1 8oz can pineapple rings, drain and reserve the juice
1 1/4 cups sifted all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt

Needed for the glaze:
1/2 - 1 cup powdered sugar
1 -2 teaspoons of reserved pineapple juice

Directions:
Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees. Cream shortening and sugar until fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each. Add mayonnaise. In a food processor, pulse the pineapple rings until chopped fine, add bananas and pulse until well combined. Add pineapple and banana mixture to the batter and mix well. Sift together the flour, soda, and salt. Add to the batter a little at a time until all is combined. 

Pour into a greased and floured, nine-inch loaf pan. Bake at 350 for 35 to 45 minutes. Check for doneness when a toothpick, inserted, comes out clean and edges of bread begin to pull away from the pan. Let cool 30 minutes and drizzle with glaze.

Glaze directions:
Combine powdered sugar and 1 teaspoon of pineapple juice and mix well. Add a little more juice until mixture is thick enough to hold onto the spoon, spatula or whisk you are using, but loose enough to pour in a steady stream. If too thick, add a little more juice. If too thin, add a little more powdered sugar. Drizzle over bread and serve. There will be enough that you can drizzle over slices before serving if desired.



Now all I need is a good cup of coffee! It's a cold and rainy day, so warm Pineapple Banana Bread, coffee, and enough time to take a late morning nap will make things right with the world.


Friday, January 19, 2018

I called it!!

Growing up in a large family, you rarely have anything that you can call your own. So when you have an opportunity, you grab it as quickly as you can. Since I was the youngest, my brothers always seemed to have the upper hand. I always got hand-me-downs for clothes. I remember one set of jeans that were brand new, but then one of my brothers got the same ones. They had soup labels all over them and I thought they were great. But since I had the same pair as my brother Bobby, I didn't have to inherit his.

As I mentioned before, at Christmas our parents tried to make sure that we were all treated equally. That meant that most of what we got was the same, but one or two things were special for each of us. I had gotten a Tonka Dump Truck one year. It must have weighed 20 pounds. It was all metal and so big I could ride in the back of it and I would ride it up and down the driveway. Well, I didn't have it long before Bobby sold it to our neighbor, Little Richard. Our moms worked it out and I got it back again. I guess Bobby had to pay him back or work it off.

This I think was just like my Tonka Dump Truck. It is for sale on Ebay for $90 and says it's from 1974, which would be about right. I bet Bobby didn't get that much for it!

One thing that we each got an opportunity to call our very own was the passenger seat up front in the car, but of course, it was only when just dad or mom was driving. The moment we knew we were going somewhere, we would all start to yell "I've got the front seat!" and the first to scream out got it. Mom would usually have to judge who said it first, but that didn't stop us from arguing about it and we would all demand "I called it!!". The other three then would scream for a window. The loser would end up in the middle of the back seat.

One of mom's first cars was a huge yellow station wagon. It was a 9 passenger wagon that had the seat in the very back, which faced the back window. We would call that one too. We got a kick out of seeing where we had been and waving at the cars behind us. One time she was driving to Grandmaw Barton's and as she turned into the driveway, she sideswiped a tree. The station wagon was so long that you really needed to swing out to make a turn in it. I remember that I was in the back seat and I was telling her that she was hitting the tree. I probably didn't help her one bit and probably made it worse. She just left the car there and we all got out to look at it. I think my brother Pat had to get behind the wheel and get it off the tree. He was probably 12 or 13, but already a pretty good driver.

This looks pretty close to mom's wagon. It's a shame we can't see the passenger side of it. I would know it was hers if the back door was crushed in.
Once we each began driving and then ended up with our own cars, we stopped calling the front seat. But we replaced it with calling leftovers and marking our food in the fridge. It wasn't like any of us looked as though we missed a meal, but we called it just the same. Today, most anything we cook, we share it with anyone we can. Mick and I do fight for the passenger seat sometimes though, but that's just because we don't feel like driving.

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

I had a hankerin

Last night I was hankerin for some No Bake Cookies, so I got things started. However, I soon realized that I didn't have everything I needed, like enough cocoa or enough oatmeal. It's kind of hard to make them without those 2 things. I found some chocolate chips that I decided to use and I did have plenty of Rice Crispies. I thought I could just substitute these two and it would be fine. I was wrong. The taste was not bad, but the cereal was just chewy, and not in a good way but a stale way. We ended up throwing them out.

I told them at work what I had done. I wasn't embarrassed for messing them up. You just never know until you try sometimes. Although in this case, I probably should have known. We all got to talking about the No Bake Cookies and how much we now wanted some. It seems all of us in the office like them gooey, while Mick likes them hard. When I got home, I decided to make a batch for work and a batch for home. We got a little snow today, but not enough for snowcream, so I had to make something. For the work batch I used Hershey's Special Dark Cocoa and for Mick's I used regular Hershey's Unsweetened Cocoa.




The recipe is simple:

No Bake Cookies, also called Refrigerator Cookies, also called Novacks

2 cups sugar
6 tablespoons cocoa
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 tablespoon vanilla
1/2 cup peanut butter, creamy or crunchy
3 - 4 cups oatmeal, quick or long cook

In a 3 quart or larger saucepan, combine the sugar, cocoa, butter, and milk. Dissolve sugar and bring mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Once it comes to a rolling boil, cook for 1 minute or less for gooey cookies or cook for 2-3 minutes for firmer cookies.



Remove from heat and add vanilla and peanut butter and mix until completely combined. Add half the oats and mix well. Continue to add more oatmeal to the mix until the batter begins to stiffen. Scoop cookies with a spoon and set on parchment or wax paper to cool. Once set, store in an airtight container for up to a week.



Friday, January 12, 2018

Grandmaw’s hand

Last night I dreamed that Grandmaw Barton came over to where I was sitting, sat down and took my hand. We just sat there. I can still feel how her hand felt in mine. It was strong, yet fragile. It was cold, but I felt warmth. We said nothing, but I felt so much.



I don’t remember Grandmaw ever holding my hand, but I am sure she did when I was little. I know I wrote in the last post that she could be scary, but that’s just when she would get after us for getting into something, which we did often. I loved and admired her so much and I see lots of her in me. I do remember taking her hand when uncle Lester brought her to dad’s funeral. By that time she was in her early nineties. She was living with Lester and was in a wheelchair. She didn’t have the strength to walk anymore and her eyesight had gone by then. She knew my voice right away though and her mind was very intact.

She passed 3 years ago this month, at the age of 97. In my dream though, she walked over to me and took my hand. I don’t know why I dreamed about her. It could be nothing more than a dream. I am out of town for work this week and we are all staying in an old house that was probably built about 100 years ago, but I don’t think it’s that. She did have the gift of “sight”, or “visions” as she called them. I’m sure I’ve mentioned this before. That is one of the things I see in myself that reminds me of her. I sometimes know things, but I don’t have visions in the middle of the day like she did. I do have dreams though that end up being prophetic. I remember them so vividly. I also have visits in my dreams. That’s what I think this was. Perhaps she just wanted to let me know that she is with me, helping watch over me as I am away from home. It was good to see her again.

UPDATE - There was something else about the dream that I didn’t mention. Mainly because it didn’t seem to mean anything to me when I was remembering things. But, after Grandmaw took my hand, another hand laid on top of ours. It was brief, but I remembered it as being a small hand. That’s what I was thinking when I said that I was sure she took my hand when I was little. However, as I had said, I was out of town and internet connections were sketchy all week. The WiFi where we were staying didn’t work and I had very litttle time to be online, although I had time in the early hours of the morning to write the post. Late this afternoon I found out that my niece gave birth to her little girl yesterday evening. When I found out, it hit me that the little hand must have been hers. Grandmaw was either there to introduce us or she was helping me with my sight. So I honestly believe that my nieces great grandmother introduced me to my great niece! Happy Birth Day Ivory Denise!!