Search These Tales

Friday, January 19, 2018

I called it!!

Growing up in a large family, you rarely have anything that you can call your own. So when you have an opportunity, you grab it as quickly as you can. Since I was the youngest, my brothers always seemed to have the upper hand. I always got hand-me-downs for clothes. I remember one set of jeans that were brand new, but then one of my brothers got the same ones. They had soup labels all over them and I thought they were great. But since I had the same pair as my brother Bobby, I didn't have to inherit his.

As I mentioned before, at Christmas our parents tried to make sure that we were all treated equally. That meant that most of what we got was the same, but one or two things were special for each of us. I had gotten a Tonka Dump Truck one year. It must have weighed 20 pounds. It was all metal and so big I could ride in the back of it and I would ride it up and down the driveway. Well, I didn't have it long before Bobby sold it to our neighbor, Little Richard. Our moms worked it out and I got it back again. I guess Bobby had to pay him back or work it off.

This I think was just like my Tonka Dump Truck. It is for sale on Ebay for $90 and says it's from 1974, which would be about right. I bet Bobby didn't get that much for it!

One thing that we each got an opportunity to call our very own was the passenger seat up front in the car, but of course, it was only when just dad or mom was driving. The moment we knew we were going somewhere, we would all start to yell "I've got the front seat!" and the first to scream out got it. Mom would usually have to judge who said it first, but that didn't stop us from arguing about it and we would all demand "I called it!!". The other three then would scream for a window. The loser would end up in the middle of the back seat.

One of mom's first cars was a huge yellow station wagon. It was a 9 passenger wagon that had the seat in the very back, which faced the back window. We would call that one too. We got a kick out of seeing where we had been and waving at the cars behind us. One time she was driving to Grandmaw Barton's and as she turned into the driveway, she sideswiped a tree. The station wagon was so long that you really needed to swing out to make a turn in it. I remember that I was in the back seat and I was telling her that she was hitting the tree. I probably didn't help her one bit and probably made it worse. She just left the car there and we all got out to look at it. I think my brother Pat had to get behind the wheel and get it off the tree. He was probably 12 or 13, but already a pretty good driver.

This looks pretty close to mom's wagon. It's a shame we can't see the passenger side of it. I would know it was hers if the back door was crushed in.
Once we each began driving and then ended up with our own cars, we stopped calling the front seat. But we replaced it with calling leftovers and marking our food in the fridge. It wasn't like any of us looked as though we missed a meal, but we called it just the same. Today, most anything we cook, we share it with anyone we can. Mick and I do fight for the passenger seat sometimes though, but that's just because we don't feel like driving.

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

I had a hankerin

Last night I was hankerin for some No Bake Cookies, so I got things started. However, I soon realized that I didn't have everything I needed, like enough cocoa or enough oatmeal. It's kind of hard to make them without those 2 things. I found some chocolate chips that I decided to use and I did have plenty of Rice Crispies. I thought I could just substitute these two and it would be fine. I was wrong. The taste was not bad, but the cereal was just chewy, and not in a good way but a stale way. We ended up throwing them out.

I told them at work what I had done. I wasn't embarrassed for messing them up. You just never know until you try sometimes. Although in this case, I probably should have known. We all got to talking about the No Bake Cookies and how much we now wanted some. It seems all of us in the office like them gooey, while Mick likes them hard. When I got home, I decided to make a batch for work and a batch for home. We got a little snow today, but not enough for snowcream, so I had to make something. For the work batch I used Hershey's Special Dark Cocoa and for Mick's I used regular Hershey's Unsweetened Cocoa.




The recipe is simple:

No Bake Cookies, also called Refrigerator Cookies, also called Novacks

2 cups sugar
6 tablespoons cocoa
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 tablespoon vanilla
1/2 cup peanut butter, creamy or crunchy
3 - 4 cups oatmeal, quick or long cook

In a 3 quart or larger saucepan, combine the sugar, cocoa, butter, and milk. Dissolve sugar and bring mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Once it comes to a rolling boil, cook for 1 minute or less for gooey cookies or cook for 2-3 minutes for firmer cookies.



Remove from heat and add vanilla and peanut butter and mix until completely combined. Add half the oats and mix well. Continue to add more oatmeal to the mix until the batter begins to stiffen. Scoop cookies with a spoon and set on parchment or wax paper to cool. Once set, store in an airtight container for up to a week.



Friday, January 12, 2018

Grandmaw’s hand

Last night I dreamed that Grandmaw Barton came over to where I was sitting, sat down and took my hand. We just sat there. I can still feel how her hand felt in mine. It was strong, yet fragile. It was cold, but I felt warmth. We said nothing, but I felt so much.



I don’t remember Grandmaw ever holding my hand, but I am sure she did when I was little. I know I wrote in the last post that she could be scary, but that’s just when she would get after us for getting into something, which we did often. I loved and admired her so much and I see lots of her in me. I do remember taking her hand when uncle Lester brought her to dad’s funeral. By that time she was in her early nineties. She was living with Lester and was in a wheelchair. She didn’t have the strength to walk anymore and her eyesight had gone by then. She knew my voice right away though and her mind was very intact.

She passed 3 years ago this month, at the age of 97. In my dream though, she walked over to me and took my hand. I don’t know why I dreamed about her. It could be nothing more than a dream. I am out of town for work this week and we are all staying in an old house that was probably built about 100 years ago, but I don’t think it’s that. She did have the gift of “sight”, or “visions” as she called them. I’m sure I’ve mentioned this before. That is one of the things I see in myself that reminds me of her. I sometimes know things, but I don’t have visions in the middle of the day like she did. I do have dreams though that end up being prophetic. I remember them so vividly. I also have visits in my dreams. That’s what I think this was. Perhaps she just wanted to let me know that she is with me, helping watch over me as I am away from home. It was good to see her again.

UPDATE - There was something else about the dream that I didn’t mention. Mainly because it didn’t seem to mean anything to me when I was remembering things. But, after Grandmaw took my hand, another hand laid on top of ours. It was brief, but I remembered it as being a small hand. That’s what I was thinking when I said that I was sure she took my hand when I was little. However, as I had said, I was out of town and internet connections were sketchy all week. The WiFi where we were staying didn’t work and I had very litttle time to be online, although I had time in the early hours of the morning to write the post. Late this afternoon I found out that my niece gave birth to her little girl yesterday evening. When I found out, it hit me that the little hand must have been hers. Grandmaw was either there to introduce us or she was helping me with my sight. So I honestly believe that my nieces great grandmother introduced me to my great niece! Happy Birth Day Ivory Denise!!




Monday, January 8, 2018

A Tale of Witch Hazel and Vicks.

It has been in the teens and single digits for the past couple of weeks, so everyone's been doing what they can to keep from getting sick. I had my flu shot a couple of months ago, eat oranges and clean the machines at the gym before and after I use them. So far, that has worked for me.

Growing up, we never heard of a flu shot. I am sure they were around, but we never knew about them and never got one. A runny nose or a cough was nothing new with a house full of kids so mom was always setting up the vaporizer and rubbing Vick's on our chest. And, I seem to remember a mustard paste on my chest a time or two. I can't remember what else mom would have used the tin of powdered mustard for. If we had cough medicine in the cabinet, it was Vick's Formula 44. I also remember her mentioning Witch Hazel all the time, but not sure if she used it. It scared me a little bit. Gramdaw's name was Hazel, and grandmaw could scare you if she wanted to, so Witch Hazel was certainly much scarier. Mom may have put it in the vaporizer a time or two. I think that thing was on in the bedroom we all shared the whole winter through and when one of us was sick, the rest of us would just feel damp by morning. It was bigger around than a basketball and looked like a spaceship with a light mist coming out of the top.

Sometimes just opening the jar and taking a deep breath was all I needed to open my head right up.  In the commercial below, I remember seeing the second half because it reminded me of dad. He was the biggest baby when he would get sick and would look at you everytime he coughed like you gave it to him. We probably did! I think we all made fun of him about this one.



Mom lived by that old saying "Feed a cold, starve a fever.". Feeding a cold usually meant a can of Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup. We never had homemade. Now that I'm grown, I make soup all winter long. Homemade chicken noodle soup is like mom kissing a boo boo. It just makes it all better. If we had a sore throat, it was a gargle with warm salt water. If we had a cough with that sore throat, a hot mug of lemon and honey water or tea was the remedy. I told you before about the hot toddy that Charlie would make me sometimes after I shoveled their driveway. If I got too hot and started coughing it would help, and sometimes it was to keep a cold away. Well, mom kept a bottle of something in the linen closet for just that occasion too. I doubt there was any more alcohol in the hot toddy than there was in a dose of cough syrup, but it would break things up in your chest and you slept pretty good. Mom would check for a fever first by touching your forehead, then by asking us if we felt like we had a fever. I would usually know if my eyes were burning. I never liked the thermometer. She would pour alcohol over it to sterilize it and it always tasted nasty.

If we just had an upset stomach, we would usually get a Ginger Ale or a flat Coke. I am not sure why it was best if it was flat. I guess your stomach didn't need the fizz if it was already upset. When I was in elementary school, the office called home one time to tell them that I was sick. Mom and dad had the day off for some reason and picked me up on their way to grandmaw Barton's house. I kept telling them that I didn't feel good, but mom thought I just wanted to spend the day with them and they took all the time they needed getting to grandmaw's and back home. But, when we pulled in the driveway, I jumped out of the car and threw up all over the front steps. I probably skipped dinner and had a flat coke before going to bed that night.

A day home sick meant that we sometimes got to watch tv, curled up on the couch with a blanket. I would usually watch reruns of Gidget, Bewitched, I Love Lucy and Andy Griffith. I'm not sure if the shows made me feel better or being home with just mom and none of my brothers did the trick. I forget about those simple remedies sometimes, and sometimes its best to go to the doctor, get some medicine and get back to life. But, sometimes you just want to curl up on the couch in a comfy blanket and let the ills of the day fall away.